PSN-L Email List Message

Subject: Re: Ruby on carbide...a surprise result
From: "meredith lamb" paleoartifact@.........
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2008 10:47:39 -0600


Hi Chris,

Actually what you suggest trying, was actually my first trial model; but it
had no rotational
zeroing effect on the top pivot rod at all....the rod can be placed anywhere
thereon...but yes, it
is a a type of holding magnet.

When placed directly over the magnet joints as on the web page; when the rod
is slightly rotated
off the "zeroing line" its immediately magnetically and rotationally
attracted back to its original set
magnet joint line position.  It is yes; a rather weak effect given the size
of the mass likely used, but
at least the magnet joint "line" is a easy reference to where it should be;
at least in that one
plane.

The same effect can be easily seen with a example single magnet, where if
you set the rod on the
side/s where the N and S center; it tends to position itself there.
Yes...the magnet/s could be
considerably smaller; and likewise; so could all the cross rods.

I would guess its best application would be in a S-G.

Take care, Meredith





On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 9:21 PM,  wrote:

> In a message dated 2008/06/26, paleoartifact@......... writes:
>
> What what little its worth, I also put up another web test page, where
> magnetics is used with carbide crossed rods to somewhat "assist" the pivot
> rod in its rotational zero position line aspect.  See:
> http://seismometer.googlepages.com/mcrp
>
>
>
> Hi Meredith,
>
>        Try rotating the rods by 90 degrees so that one lies along the N
> pole and the other along the S pole. The cross bar will be attracted to them
> quite strongly. You could probably then use much smaller magnets?
>
>        Regards,
>
>        Chris
Hi Chris,
 
Actually what you suggest trying, was actually my first trial model; but it had no rotational
zeroing effect on the top pivot rod at all....the rod can be placed anywhere thereon...but yes, it
is a a type of holding magnet.
 
When placed directly over the magnet joints as on the web page; when the rod is slightly rotated
off the "zeroing line" its immediately magnetically and rotationally attracted back to its original set
magnet joint line position.  It is yes; a rather weak effect given the size of the mass likely used, but
at least the magnet joint "line" is a easy reference to where it should be; at least in that one
plane.
 
The same effect can be easily seen with a example single magnet, where if you set the rod on the
side/s where the N and S center; it tends to position itself there.  Yes...the magnet/s could be
considerably smaller; and likewise; so could all the cross rods.
 
I would guess its best application would be in a S-G.
 
Take care, Meredith
 
 


 
On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 9:21 PM, <ChrisAtUpw@.......> wrote:
In a message dated 2008/06/26, paleoartifact@......... writes:

What what little its worth, I also put up another web test page, where magnetics is used with carbide crossed rods to somewhat "assist" the pivot rod in its rotational zero position line aspect.  See:  http://seismometer.googlepages.com/mcrp


Hi Meredith,

       Try rotating the rods by 90 degrees so that one lies along the N pole and the other along the S pole. The cross bar will be attracted to them quite strongly. You could probably then use much smaller magnets?

       Regards,

       Chris


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